Battery Radio Tubes Gallery

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UV-200 Detector

 These early triode tubes were argon gas filled and use 5 volts for the filament and 1 amp.  Shown above is a UV-200 tube.  The box is from a later design UX-200 tube. RCA started producing this four pin triode in 1920. 

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UV-201

 The UV-201 triode tube could be used as a detector or amplifier and were not gas filled like the 00 tubes of this era. Like the UV-200 it uses 5 volts for the filaments and draws 1 amp of power. RCA produced this tube starting in 1920 and ended production in 1922 to make way for the UV-201A 

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UV-201A

   This RCA Radiotron UV-201A  is an example of the earlier 01A tubes. Like the 01 tube the 01A could could be used as both detector or amplifier, but it usess only 1/4 amp of power. The 01A   was developed to draw less power so the batteries of the early radios would last longer. Production started in 1922. .

More 01a's

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Other Versions

  The earlier 01A on the left  with later designs, the Wizard brand ST in the center and the Cunningham 301-A on the right. Both have the newer UX base with long pins. The first number designates the manufacturer although later on some manufacturers would use the same first number. Cunningham used the number 3 .

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In Demand

  A rare Magnatron DC-201A rainbow tube next to a Wards Super Airline Gold tube. Rainbow and Airline gold tubes are highly sought after by early 20's battery radio collectors.   

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Deforest Audion

 This Deforest Audion D-01A has an isolantite base, a form of ceramic. 

the ABC's of 01A's

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STANDARD 01A TUBE

The standard 01A tube uses 5 volts at .25 amps of power for the filaments.

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01B TUBE

Like the 01A, the 01B uses 5 volts of power but only .125 amps of current to light the filaments.

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01C TUBE

The 01C also uses 5 volts for the filaments, but only .06 amps of current.

MOre Tubes

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GE 99

 General Electric of Bridgeport Conn. introduced the 99 tube in 1925 under the RCA brand.  This detector/ amplifier triode uses 3 volts for the filament and draws only .06 amps. 

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RCA UX-199

  The UX-199 detector/amplifier was manufactured from 1925 - 1931. 

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RCA UX-120

  The UX-120 is an amplifier only radio tube. It uses 3 volts for the filament 135 volts plate voltage, but draws .13 amps, about double what the UX-199 draw 

WD-11

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RCA WD-11

 The WD-11 was first produced in 1922. This triode tube uses just 1.1 volts for the filament voltage and draws 1/4 amp of power. 

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 Early WD-11 and the later design, WX-11. 

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Unusual Base

 The WD and WX-11 tubes had an unusual pin design with one large pin and three smaller ones. 

WD-12

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Original WD-11

 Produced from 1923 -1926, the WD-12 was developed by Westinghouse Electrical & Manufacturing for RCA.  This brass based, tipped triode  uses 1.1 volts for its filaments and draws 1/4 amp of power. 

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 Above  is the early WD-12 (left) with the later design WX-12 which had a bakelite base.  

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Crosley Pup Connection

 The Crosley Pup was designed for the WD-12 tube. 

A Very Rare Tube

These Brightson tubes are 01A equivalent.  Brightson Laboratories was in business less than a year before closing its doors.  Brighton tubes were a premium tube that was priced several times the cost of a regular 01A tube. 

Deforest Type 20 (1923)

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Fleming Patent Expires

In 1922 the patents of John Ambrose Fleming on the manufacturing of vacuum tubes expired. In 1923 the Deforest Radio Telephone & Telegraph Company began manufacturing vacuum tubes and this was one of the first types produced.

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September 1923

Deforest  Radio Telephone & Telegraph Company  advertises it's line of DV radio vacuum tubes.

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DV-6A

The type 20 has a nickel base and thoriated filament which uses half the current of earlier oxide coated platinum filament and are gettered.

Deforest DL-2 Audion with Isolantite base (1927) DeForest Radio Telephone and Telegraph Company.

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Modified DV-2

First sold in 1926 with a bakelite base. Electrically identical to the DV-2  but with a UX base made of Isolantite, a form of ceramic.

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Stats

The DL-2 uses 5 volts for the filaments, 150 volt plate voltage and draws 1/4 amp of power.

Low Emissions

The DL-2 could not compete with the performance of 01A's and type 99 tubes and was discontinued in 1928.

Q*r*s Redtop tubes 1924 QRS Music company, Chicago

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Triode

The QRS Redtop tube is a four pin triode with a UX type base.

 

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The QRS tube was the equivalent of an 01A tube

  The tube has a five volt filament voltage and used 1/4 amp of power.  

Power/output triodes

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UX-112A

The 12A type tubes appeared in 1924. They use five volts filament voltage and draw 1/4 amp of power.  The tube pictured to the left is a Radiotron UX-112A  triode power/output tube.

 

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CX-371A

First sold in 1927 the 71A tube is a power/output tube used in the last audio amplification stage to boost output higher than an 01A tube could. The tube pictured to the left is a Cunningham 371-A tube. Like the 12A, the 71A used five volts filament voltage and draw 1/4 amp of power.