Crosely Type 2 (1924) Crosley Radio Corp. - Cincinnati, OH

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Sold by Sears

 Sold by Sears as the Precision Type 2, this was a TRF radio with regeneration.

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A Crosley 50 In A Small Cabinet

It sure is tight in there, this is 2nd smallest mass market 20's battery tube radio I've ever seen, only the Crosley Pup being smaller. Inside is the usual Crosley book capacitor, tickler coil, grid-leak and grid-leak mica capacitor and WD-12 tube.

RCA Radiola ER-753A (1922) RCA Victor INC, New YOrk

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RCA Brands All Its Receivers "Radiola"

Originally RCA called this radio the ER-753A. In late summer of 1922 RCA changed its name to the "Radiola I". They had decided to brand all their radios as Radiola. Examples of this model in excellent condition  are rare.

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No Ink Fill

Early models of this crystal radio had red and white ink fill in the control panel. The Radiola I pictured here has no ink fill in the lettering of the control panel, which means it was produced in July, 1922 during the second run of manufacturing.

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Rear Compartment

Headphones, which came with the Radiola I, could be stored in this rear compartment along with an antenna and ground wire.

Colin B. Kennedy Type 220 (1921) - San Francisco/St. Louis

TRF Receiver

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The Type 220 has a range of 175 to 3100 meters.

Later Version

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This is a  later version, identified as such by the two cities names on the front panel and the bakelite caps  on the binding posts. Earlier versions had San Francisco only on the front bakelite panel and the caps were nickel plated steel.

Tube Lineup

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The Type  220 uses a  00 type , one amp detector tube. Kennedy  products are considered one of the "top of  the line" brands of its era.

COLIN B. KENNEDY TYPE 525 (1921) ST. LOUIS / SAN FRANCISCO

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Two Stage Amplifier

The Type 525 used two 00 type one amp tubes with a pair of transformers for audio amplification. 

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Early Model

The Type 525 pictured here is an early edition, identified by having only the city of San Francisco on its face plate and having steel thumb nuts topping off its binding posts.

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Shelf Mates

The Type 525 amplifier could be paired with the Type 220 receiver as shown  (left) or the Type 110 receiver to drive a speaker horn.

Crosley type 52 (1924) crosley Radio Corp. , Ohio

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TRF

The Crosley was a TRF (tuned radio frequency) radio , Crosley radios are considered good performers for a low cost radio.

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The Type 52 was basically a Type 51  with a second stage of audio amplification.

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Tube Line-up

Three tubes, one detector and two amplifier tubes are used in this radio , all are 01A  tubes. 

Neutrowound Super Six (1926) neutrowound Radio MFG. Co.

The "Armoured Breadboard"

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Because of its unique steel housing the Super Six is often referred to as  "The Armoured Breadboard" among collectors.  Sadly, the company only lasted about five years.

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On  the right side is a ground connection  with four antenna connections for different length antenna's.

Six 01A Tube Line-up

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With three RF tubes and three stage audio output the Super Six is a very good performer in skilled hands.